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Emotional abuse is much harder to recognize, but no less damaging.

At the 2008 Summer Meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General, Attorneys General from across the nation passed a resolution encouraging schools to develop teen dating violence awareness curriculum.

Tweens and teens are experiencing disturbing levels of violence in their dating relationships, but only half recognize the warning signs of a dangerous relationship.

A 2008 study commissioned by Liz Claiborne and found: Abuse in a dating relationship can be confusing and frightening at any age.

Teen dating violence is a serious issue affecting young people in our communities Each year, 1 in 3 teens in the U. is a victim of verbal, physical, emotional or sexual abuse from a dating partner.

Violent relationships in adolescence can have serious ramifications by putting the victims at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior and adult re-victimization.

And so, to help further the discussion, we offer in this article a gender-based analysis of teen dating violence with a developmental perspective.[5] We look at what we know — and what we don't know — about who is the perpetrator and who is the victim in teen dating violence.

We also discuss how adult and adolescent romantic relationships differ in the hope that an examination of existing research will help us better understand the problem and move the field toward the creation of developmentally appropriate prevention programs and effective interventions for teenagers.

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Interestingly, the rates of reported victimization versus perpetration in the state were similar for boys and girls.[3] However, when it comes to severe teen dating violence — including sexual and physical assault — girls were disproportionately the victims.[4] At a recent workshop on teen dating violence, co-sponsored by the U. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Health and Human Services (HHS), researchers presented findings from several studies that found that girls and boys perpetrate the same frequency of physical aggression in romantic relationships.

This finding was at odds with what practitioners attending the workshop said they encounter in their professional experience.